Control strategies for swede midge in organic production

Description

The swede midge has been the main pest of crucifers (cabbage family) in Québec since 2003. Its presence throughout the season, the difficulty of detecting the damage it causes, and its cryptic behaviour make controlling this pest very complicated. Organic producers currently rely on pest exclusion nets, which are expensive to use. It is important, therefore, to develop other effective ways of controlling this pest.

Objective(s)

  • Evaluate effective and economically viable control strategies for swede midge that are healthy for both humans and the ecosystem
  • Evaluate swede midge control strategies in organic crucifer production based on data already available in Québec, other Canadian provinces, the U.S., and elsewhere in the world.

From 2014 to 2018

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control, Organic farming

Services

This work will lead to the development of a strategy to help control the cauliflower plant’s most formidable insect pest.

Partner

Growing Forward 2

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