Developing a weed control knowledge transfer tool for organic market gardeners

Maryse Leblanc, researcher

Maryse Leblanc

Researcher

450 653-7368
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Contact Maryse Leblanc

Description

This project seeks to develop a knowledge transfer tool to assist organic market gardeners with weed control. The tool will take the form of a digital datasheet with hyperlinks that facilitate access to the videos and websites of machinery manufacturers and distributors, among others. It will provide information on a wide variety of weeding equipment and the parameters for using them with a variety of market garden crops.

Objective(s)

  • Compile information on weed-control equipment and methods appropriate for market gardening, including automated and robotized precision tools.
  • Organize the information according to various criteria in order to provide consultants with easy and intuitive access.
  • Develop a transfer tool in the form of a digital datasheet with hyperlinks that provide users with access to the videos and websites of equipment manufacturers and distributors, among others.

From 2019 to 2020

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

This tool will help organic market gardeners seeking weed control solutions.

Partner

Centre de référence en agriculture et agroalimentaire du Québec

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