Protecting the Rivière-Ouelle watershed

Aubert Michaud, researcher

Aubert Michaud

Researcher

418 643-2380
ext 690

Contact Aubert Michaud

Description

Rivière-Ouelle is a salmon river that is also home to a number of special-status species, including rainbow smelt, American eel, striped bass, and sand martin, that require concerted conservation efforts.

Steps are being taken throughout the watershed to preserve water quality:
- in fields, to reduce the runoff of soil, fertilizer, and pesticides;
- along the river banks; and
- in wetlands.

Objective(s)

  • Set up an initial profile of the agri-environmental situation as it relates to farming practices, crop management, the condition of the river banks, crop rotations, soil health, and the range of species in the watershed.
  • Identify areas subject to erosion.
  • Evaluate any initiatives undertaken by businesses that could increase the runoff of soil, fertilizer, or pesticides.
  • Propose and implement actions to reduce potential runoff and contamination risks.
  • Create a profile of the actions undertaken and assess improvements in the watershed.

2019

Project duration

Water protection, Ecosystem protection

Services

IRDA is helping farmers adopt profitable agricultural practices that also protect biodiversity.

Partner

Groupe conseil agricole de la Côte-du-Sud

This may interest you

River and cows
2016-2019

Participative research on sustainable options for on-farm water management adapted to climate change

The objective of the project is to co-develop, with producers and local water management organizations, potential adaptation strategies to prevent water use conflicts in farming communities in the face of climate change.

Researcher: Aubert Michaud

Read more about the project

Aubert Michaud
River
2016-2018

GIS tool kit to support municipal drain management in preparation for climate change

The purpose of this project was to develop a set of spatially referenced tools for watercourse managers and those in charge of planning sustainable, environmentally friendly improvements to water systems.

Researcher: Aubert Michaud

Read more about the project

Aubert Michaud
Barcoding
2015-2017

Improving molecular techniques for identifying pests to meet the diagnostic needs of the agricultural industry in the context of climate change

Barcoding can be used to obtain DNA sequences from specimens kept in the official Québec government insect collection and compare these sequences with those from field-caught specimens.

Researcher: Annabelle Firlej

Read more about the project

Annabelle Firlej