Exclusion nets for organic apple production in Eastern Canada

Gérald Chouinard, researcher

Gérald Chouinard

Researcher

450 653-7368
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Contact Gérald Chouinard

Description

The aim of this project was to test the general hypothesis that exclusion nets, when properly used, can prevent attacks by most apple pests and reduce disease incidence with no major adverse effects on fruit quality. The system was adapted specifically to conditions in Eastern Canada and a water barrier treatment added (depending on the results) to protect against apple scab.

Objective(s)

  • Measure the effects of this protection system on fruit quality and profitability in the orchards’ geographic and climatic context (humid climate east of the Rockies)

From 2014 to 2018

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

IRDA helps Québec growers adopt eco-friendly tools.

Partner

Organic Agriculture Center of Canada (Dalhousie University)

Publications

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