Exclusion nets made from biobased polymers

Gérald Chouinard, researcher

Gérald Chouinard

Researcher

450 653-7368
ext 340

Contact Gérald Chouinard
Daniel Cormier, researcher

Daniel Cormier

Researcher

450 653-7368
ext 360

Contact Daniel Cormier

Description

The purpose of this project is to test the general hypothesis that biobased polymers can be used to replace fossil-fuel-based products to make better exclusion nets for protecting fruit and vegetable crops from pests and disease and further reduce the use of pesticides without increasing GHG emissions.

Objective(s)

  • Evaluate the potential for using a biopolymer to make exclusion nets for protecting high-value fruits and vegetables
  • Characterize the physical and chemical properties of candidate biopolymers
  • Improve the ability of nets made of biopolymers to exclude pests by modifying their surfaces at the nanometric (diseases) and millimetric (insects) levels

From 2017 to 2019

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

Partners

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation | Dubois Agrinovation | Polytechnique Montréal | McGill University

Publications

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