Development of an interactive development prediction and automated screening tool for monitoring cranberry leafroller populations in commercial cranberry farms

Daniel Cormier, researcher

Daniel Cormier

Researcher, Ph.D.

450 653-7368
ext 360

Contact Daniel Cormier

Description

The objective of the project is to equip cranberry producers with phytoprotection in order to ensure the sustainability of the organic sector, which is the pride of the province, but also to reduce the impact on human health and the environment of interventions. phytosanitary measures by optimizing monitoring and intervention periods for the major crop pest: the cranberry leafroller. This insect, whose damage can cause a reduction in yields of up to 95% of the annual harvest, represents the main threat to the sustainability of the organic sector.

Objective(s)

  • Optimize the insect's bioclimatic development model.
  • Create an interactive tool to model the impact of phytosanitary treatments on the dynamics of local populations and simulate future interventions in order to target optimal intervention periods.
  • Develop the use of automated traps for insect detection.

From 2020 to 2023

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Soil health, Water protection, Air quality

Services

Partners

CETAQ
APCQ
CEROM

Programme : PALCCA

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