Field trials on swede midge mating disruption

Description

The swede midge has been the main pest of crucifers (cabbage family) in Québec since 2003. Its presence throughout the season, the difficulty of detecting the damage it causes, and its cryptic behaviour make controlling this pest very complicated. Organic producers currently rely on pest exclusion nets, which are expensive to use. It is important, therefore, to develop other effective ways of controlling this pest.

In conventional production, numerous insecticide sprays are sometimes required. The health and environmental risks associated with insecticide use and consumer demand for pesticide-free products are creating pressure to find other, less risky control methods.

Objective(s)

  • Compare the ability of various pheromone mixes to prevent male swede midges from locating females

From 2017 to 2018

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

In contrast to pesticide use, this method lowers health risks to humans and the environment.

Partners

University of Vermont | University of Guelph

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