Identifying the causes of strawberry decline disease with a view to developing an integrated control strategy

Richard Hogue, researcher

Richard Hogue

Researcher

418 643-2380
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Contact Richard Hogue

Description

This project involved an exhaustive survey of viruses, phytoplasma, fungi, and nematodes in nurseries and strawberry fields to determine the exact causes of strawberry decline disease in Québec. Information on cropping systems and control methods used by strawberry plant and fruit producers was compiled in a database. The project also provided fast and effective diagnostic services.

Objective(s)

  • Determine the causes of strawberry decline disease
  • Draw up an inventory of cropping practices used by strawberry plant and fruit producers in Québec
  • Identify the main causes of the disease
  • Provide diagnostic services to help producers quickly identify the causes of the disease

From 2014 to 2017

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control, Laboratory analyzes

Services

This project will provide new diagnostic services to help growers quickly identify the cause of strawberry decline disease.

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