Methane treatment of a covered slurry tank using a high efficiency biofilter

Matthieu Girard, researcher

Matthieu Girard

Researcher

418 643-2380
ext 670

Contact Matthieu Girard

Description

Stored pig manure is a major source of greenhouse gases. In Canada, in 2008, stored pig manure released 1.3 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent in the form of methane. Methane concentrations from pig manure storage tanks are generally too low to be burned, but biofilters can be used to manage them.

Objective(s)

  • Demonstrate the long-term performance of a high-efficiency inorganic biofilter for treating gases from covered pig manure storage tanks

From 2015 to 2017

Project duration

Livestock production

Activity areas

Coexisting in an agricultural environment, Air quality

Services

Biofiltration of Québec manure pits has the potential to treat the equivalent of the emissions from one million cars each year.

Partners

Prime-Vert Programme | Ministère de l’Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l’Alimentation du Québec | Université de Sherbrooke | Ferme Marnie

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