Large-scale use of codling moth mating disruption in Quebec orchards

Daniel Cormier, researcher

Daniel Cormier

Researcher, Ph.D.

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Description

The aim of our project was to increase the acreage on which mating disruption is used against the codling moth in all of Québec’s apple-growing regions. This will significantly reduce the number of insecticide sprays for this pest and the associated risks to better protect human health and the environment.

Objective(s)

  • Raise awareness among Québec apple growers about this alternative to insecticides
  • Increase the Québec apple orchard acreage using codling moth mating disruption to 25% by the end of the project
  • Reduce by 25% the number of insecticide sprays for the codling moth applied by producers using mating disruption

From 2016 to 2018

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

By 2017, 137 Québec orchards, an area equivalent to 2,800 football fields, were using mating disruption to control codling moth.

Partner

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec - Prime-Vert Programme

Publications

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