Biological control of leek moth through the release of trichogramma wasps in organic leek production in Québec

Annabelle Firlej, researcher

Annabelle Firlej

Description

An initial laboratory phase was aimed at comparing the efficacy of two parasites T. brassicae and T. ostriniae on leek moth. The purpose of a second, two-year phase, conducted at the Organic Agriculture Innovation Platform in Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, is to test the ability of both parasites to reduce leek moth damage in the field compared to a control. A technical and economic analysis will look at the costs and benefits of trichogramma releases.

Objective(s)

  • Determine in the lab and the field the capacity of two species of trichogramma wasps raised commercially in Québec (T. brassicae and T. ostriniae) to parasitize leek moth eggs and reduce larval populations and the damage they cause on organic leeks
  • Develop a cost-effective, ecofriendly control strategy that protects natural enemies

From 2015 to 2019

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Ecosystem protection, Pest, weed, and disease control, Organic farming

Services

This project will pave the way for a strategy for controlling leek moth that harms neither the environment nor beneficial wildlife.

Partners

Growing Forward 2 | Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec - Innov'Action Programme | Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada | Université du Québec à Montréal | Anatis Bioprotection | Pleine Terre | Pôle d'excellence en lutte intégrée - CLD Jardins de Napierville | Coopérative des agriculteurs de proximité écologique

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