Implementation, management, and assessment of flower strips in orchards to promote the biodiversity of beneficial arthropods as an alternative to pesticide application

Daniel Cormier, researcher

Daniel Cormier

Researcher, Ph.D.

450 653-7368
ext 360

Contact Daniel Cormier
Gérald Chouinard, researcher

Gérald Chouinard

Researcher, agr., Ph.D.

450 653-7368
ext 340

Contact Gérald Chouinard

Description

This project aims to make better use of orchard inter-rows by planting flower strips consisting of perennial and native plants, and managing them in a way that provides the resources needed by beneficial arthropods and, hence, improved recruitment of pollinators and the natural enemies of pests. This project will develop and assess the planting of flower strips in orchard inter-rows as an alternative to the application of insecticides. It also addresses certain industry priorities, insofar as the development of organic production is a stated objective of the Québec apple industry.

Objective(s)

  • Select native and perennial flowering plants that are attractive to and useful for beneficial arthropods.
  • Study the recruitment of pollinators and their effects on the pollination of apple trees.
  • Monitor the role of flower strips in biological pest control.

From 2020 to 2023

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

This project will develop the use of flower strips as an alternative to the application of insecticides in orchards.

Partner

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec

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