Improving irrigation management with accurate measurements of effective precipitation

Carl Boivin, researcher

Carl Boivin

Researcher

418 643-2380
ext 430

Contact Carl Boivin

Description

The project consisted of manufacturing and testing a portable rain simulator to estimate, under various conditions, what proportion of irrigation water a crop is able to use. The device was tested on various types of soils and production systems. It was designed to simulate different precipitation intensities. The results can then be considered when using a water budget.

Objective(s)

  • Measure the actual efficiency of precipitation in horticultural field crop production

From 2016 to 2017

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Optimal water management

Service

IRDA helps growers optimize water usage for crop irrigation.

Partners

Atelier d’Usinage Jules Roberge | Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec | Programme d’appui au développement de l’agriculture et de l’agroalimentaire en région

This may interest you

Farm - Ìle d'Orléans

Île d’Orléans farmers rally to tackle water shortage

This project aims to explore and experiment new approaches and ways to preserve, develop, and enhance the MRC’s bio-food sector, and reduce or eliminate the water deficit on the island.

Read more about the project

Carl Boivin
Stéphane Godbout
Forage crop
2019-2023 • Market gardeningField crops

Implementing a three-year sustainable forage crop rotation for potato and field crop farmers

This project seeks to create farmer partnerships in which participants work on implementing a three-year forage crop rotation protocol in potato and field crop fields.

Researcher: Richard Hogue

Read more about the project

Richard Hogue
Carrots
2019-2023 • Market gardeningField crops

Developing strategies and methods for weeding carrots grown in rotation with field crops

Development of weeding strategies and methods that will reduce weed pressure on carrot crops, especially row-crop carrots, which appear to be the most problematic.

Researcher: Maryse Leblanc

Read more about the project

Maryse Leblanc