Attract-and-kill techniques for monitoring and controlling stinkbugs in Québec orchards

Gérald Chouinard, researcher

Gérald Chouinard

Researcher

450 653-7368
ext 340

Contact Gérald Chouinard
Daniel Cormier, researcher

Daniel Cormier

Researcher

450 653-7368
ext 360

Contact Daniel Cormier

Description

A gradual increase in temperatures due to global warming combined with the arrival of new pest species as a result of trade liberalization have intensified phytosanitary problems in Québec’s orchards. Stinkbugs (including the three species commonly known as Brown, Green and Brown Marmorated stinkbugs) are among the pests that benefit from these phenomena. The first two stinkbug species are causing increasing levels of fruit damage and the third has recently gained a foothold in the Montréal area.

While some of these predatory stinkbugs are useful, the majority are plant-feeding and considered destructive, or even extremely destructive, as is the case with the Brown Marmorated stinkbug. There is currently no reliable and effective monitoring tool for these species, and the control methods are limited to a few broad-spectrum synthetic pesticides, including neonicotinoids. In addition, the species found in orchards, as well as their population numbers, vary depending on the orchard, the season, and the time of year. Together, these environmental factors point to the need to study the impact of stinkbugs on apple growing, as well as the importance of acquiring the knowledge needed to develop effective monitoring, detection, and control methods. All this must be accomplished with an eye to preserving biodiversity and reducing the potential for problems brought on by the preponderance of brown marmorated stinkbugs—an invasive, exotic, and recently established species.

Since all stinkbug species are not equally harmful or beneficial, and the specific species composition may vary according to the type of orchard, the season, and the year; the first part (A) of this study will aim to measure these variations. The effects of various monitoring systems on the species and trap catches will be compared to screening by the beating method. The results of Part A will help us better evaluate potential approaches for Part B, so as to maximize the efficacy of an attract-and-kill system along orchard borders, without recourse to insecticide sprays.

Objective(s)

  • Acquire, using proven monitoring tools, the knowledge (species present, trapping period) needed to develop an attract-and-kill treatment to control current and future stinkbug populations in Québec apple orchards.
  • Use innovative attract-and-kill tools to develop the know-how needed to successfully implement this technique in Québec.

From 2019 to 2023

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

This project seeks to develop control methods for new invasive species.

Partners

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec | Club de production Transpomme | Les Producteurs de pommes du Québec

This may interest you

DNA molecules
2019-2023 • Fruit production

A new molecular approach to simultaneously detect disease-causing viruses in raspberries and strawberries

Developing a fast and sensitive molecular detection methodology able to accurately identify raspberry and strawberry viruses.

Researchers: Richard Hogue Luc Belzile

Read more about the project

Richard Hogue
Luc Belzile
Strawberry field
2017-2019 • Fruit production

Organic strawberries grown on organic mulch: impact of nitrogen fertilization strategies on crop yields and profitability

This project tests cost-effective organic fertilization strategies for summer strawberries on plastic.

Researcher: Christine Landry

Read more about the project

Christine Landry
Fire blight disease
2017-2020 • Fruit production

Fire blight initiative

Research projects on controlling fire blight.

Researcher: Vincent Philion

Read more about the project

Vincent Philion