Variable economic injury for the apple leafcurling midge and modelling of population abundance of this emerging pest

Daniel Cormier, researcher

Daniel Cormier

Researcher, Ph.D.

450 653-7368
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Contact Daniel Cormier

Description

The apple leafcurling midge (ALM), Dasineura mali (Kieffer), is a new apple pest in Québec. Its impact on the growth and future yields of young apple trees is still little known. The aim of the project is to explore the pest’s phenology, establish variable economic injury thresholds, and incorporate the results into a phenology model in CIPRA.

Objective(s)

  • Assess the annual and cumulative impact of ALM infestations on the growth and yield of young apple trees in the establishment phase
  • Monitor the abundance of ALM adults in relation to infestation levels in commercial orchards in three apple growing regions
  • Model adult populations and develop a variable economic injury threshold

From 2014 to 2017

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

This work will help apple growers control new pests more effectively.

Partners

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec, Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada, Centre de recherche agroalimentaire de Mirabel

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